PSR-F52 New

Refer to the dealer locator for a list of musical instrument dealers nearest you. Contact the dealer by phone or other means for information on whether the product is on display and in stock.

The PSR-F52 features Songs that you can simply enjoy listening to, a Song Book with an assortment of tunes you can have fun playing from the very basics, a Smart Chord function that lets you play Styles with one finger, and other functions as well, all of which make this instrument easy to play even for beginners. Lesson videos are also available, so that you can practice while you watch to enjoy this keyboard even more.

Do not place this keyboard in an unstable location, or near other electrical products such as a TV, radio, stereo, or mobile phone, in places that are exposed to direct sunlight (such as inside a car in the middle of the day) or in places exposed to extremely high temperatures such as near a stove, or conversely in places exposed to extremely low temperatures, dust or excessive vibrations. Also, do not place vinyl, plastic, or rubber products on this keyboard, as they may cause discoloration or deformation. Also, while the PSR-F52 is a compact, lightweight keyboard that is exceptionally portable, it can also produce sound at a considerable volume, which may cause the housing of the product to vibrate sympathetically or cause a buzzing noise with some sounds and at certain volumes. This may improve if you adjust the volume, or rest the keyboard on top of a soft material such as a towel.

Please inquire with your nearest musical instruments dealer or Yamaha support.

Yes, this product can operate on batteries. Six AA-size alkaline (LR6), manganese (R6) or Ni-MH rechargeable (HR6) batteries are required.

You can use a pair of headphones or earphones with a stereo mini plug. Yamaha sells the HPH Series of headphones, which are optimum for use with digital musical instruments. Although the HPH Series headphones feature stereo mini plugs (3.5 mm diameter), they come with a standard stereo phone plug adapter, so you can use them on instruments with either kind of jack.

The keyboard on most typical pianos features 88 keys. Many popular music songs can be played on a 61-key keyboard. However, well-known Western classical music such as the Waltz in D♭, Op. 64, No. 1 (“Minute Waltz”) by Frédéric Chopin requires 76 keys to play properly. The PSR-EW310 and NP-32 have 76 keys, and many products in the P Series including the P-45 feature 88 keys.

The PSR-F52 features an organ-type keyboard that’s soft and easy to play. The low-end notes and high-end notes will all play using the same amount of force, making this keyboard suitable for popular music with a variety of sounds as well as for piano music. Other types of keyboard touch include the P Series, which use a GHS keyboard that gives you a more piano-like playing feel with a heavier key response for the lower notes and a lighter key response on the higher notes; and the NP-32, which features a soft touch that's heavier in the low notes and lighter in the high notes called “grade soft touch” (not available on the NP-12).

You can use the Split feature to play different sounds, depending on which notes of the keyboard you play. The PSR-F52 features seven split combinations of commonly used instruments, such as piano and bass guitar and so on. As with the PSR-E373, some keyboards give you the ability to freely combine sounds or change where the split begins and ends on the keyboard. See the Owner’s Manual for details.

The Duo feature lets you separate the keyboard into two identical zones, so that two people can play using the same sound and tonal range. Duo differs from Split, in that the sounds and tonal range of the separate zones are the same. Kids and their siblings might use this feature to enjoy playing a duet together, or students can benefit from the teacher’s example by playing along in Duo mode in the music classroom. See the Owner’s Manual for details.

Voices are the sounds of instruments available on a keyboard. In addition to sounds like piano and guitar, the PSR-F52 features 144 characteristic sounds of instruments from many different countries (136 instrument sounds + 8 drum kits). For a list of the built-in Voices on this keyboard, refer to the Voice List in the Owner’s Manual.

No, you cannot add Voices to the PSR-F52. Note: You can add Voices on some models such as the PSR-SX600. See the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual for details.

OTS refer to one-touch settings. Use this feature to automatically select the recommended Voices for the Song or Style you are playing. See the Owner’s Manual for details.

“Dual” is a feature that lets you stack Voices on top of each other to add impact or a fantastical sense of spaciousness to your performance. The PSR-F52 offers 21 combinations of Dual Voices to add pizzazz to your performance, such as piano with strings and so on. See the Owner’s Manual for details. You can also freely combine sounds on some models, such as the PSR-E373. “Dual” is called the “Layer” function on some models.

A “Style” refers to the rhythm or accompaniment that automatically plays when you play a chord on the keyboard. The PSR-F52 offers 158 Styles, from standard musical genres like rock and dance music to characteristic genres from many different countries. The PSR-F52 also has a built-in “Smart Chord” feature that lets you enjoy playing Styles with a single finger. For a list of the built-in Styles on the PSR-F52, refer to the Style List in the Owner’s Manual.

Generally, it’s necessary to press three or four keys (meaning, playing a chord) at the same time when playing a Style (Multi Finger mode).

However, the Smart Chord feature lets you automatically play chords and enjoy playing the Styles with just one finger. See the Smart Chord Chart in the Owner’s Manual for details on which chords will play back when you play a note.

No, you cannot add Styles to the PSR-F52. Note that you can add Styles on some models such as the PSR-E373. See the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual for details.

The PSR-F52 features 69 built-in well-known tunes from around the world that are fun to listen to as well as play. These are called “Songs.” You can practice these Songs with one hand at a time, or slow down the tempo when practicing. Some models such as the PSR-E373 feature built-in lesson functionality that lets you practice step-by-step or concentrate on individual phrases. Other models like the PSR-E463 let you play back the music you create and use that as accompaniment when you perform. For a list of the built-in Songs on the PSR-F52, refer to the Song List in the Owner’s Manual.

You can download the sheet music for the built-in Songs available on the PSR-F52. (Note: The Song Book does not contain the entire selection of Songs found on the keyboard.) This is useful for playing while looking at the notated music, or for using the chords shown when playing the Styles.

No, you cannot add Songs to the PSR-F52. Note: You can add Songs on some models such as the PSR-E373. See the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual for details.

Maximum polyphony refers to how many notes can be played at the same time. Normally, the number of notes you can play at a time is limited to the number of fingers on your hands. However, more sound to be played when you use sustain to make the notes overlap, also, the keyboard must play more sounds at once when you are using the Style or Song modes.

On most acoustic pianos, sustain refers to how the notes sound when you press down the sustain pedal. However, the function and mechanism used to make the notes you play sound for longer are also referred to as “sustain.” With the PSR-F52, you can use the button on the panel to turn sustain on and extend the duration of notes. Also, as with models such as the PSR-E273, you can connect a foot pedal or footswitch (sold separately) to operate the sustain, just as with a piano.

Transpose is a function that raises or lowers the pitch of notes you play by half tones. Use this when you’re playing along with a vocalist in a different key—an easy way to bring the key up or down, much like a karaoke machine. See the Owner’s Manual for details.

Effects process the sound of the keyboard, creating sounds like playing in a large concert hall (this type of effect is called “reverb”) and so on. Effects are featured on models such as the PSR-E273, and some models like the PSR-E373 also include effects of even higher quality, called DSP effects. Note: The PSR-F52 also features these effects, some of which has been used to process its Voices, but they cannot be edited.

Some models such as the PSR-E373 feature a wide variety of function modes that let you learn how to play in lesson format. Some of these include a mode that lets you practice by separating a song into phrases; a mode that lets you practice step-by-step by listening, learning the timing, and then playing at your pace; a mode that lets you practice how hard you play the keys; a mode for practicing how to play chords and chord progressions, and more. See the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual for details. Note: The PSR-F52 features a mode for playing the built-in songs with each hand separately, as well as for changing the tempo while you practice.

Yes, a metronome function is available on the PSR-F52. You can set the tempo from 11 to 280 (from 32 to 280 with Tap function)

With the tap function, you can set the tempo of the metronome by tapping a button at the required interval.

Volume limit refers to the maximum volume you can set on this product. For instance, you might use this to prevent children from unintentionally turning the volume on the keyboard way up, or to avoid exposing your ears to high volumes when you’re using headphones.

Sound Boost is a function that adds even greater impact to the sound for your enjoyment.

The PSR-F52 cannot be connected directly to a computer. On some models such as the PSR-E373, you can connect the keyboard to your computer via the [USB TO HOST] port and record you’re playing to the computer, or add songs.

The PSR-F52 does not have a recording feature. On models such as the PSR-E273, you can record what you play on the keyboard as a Song and then play it back. Also, some models allow you to connect to a computer and record using software, as with the PSR-E373. Refer to the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual.

Keyboard with Touch Response or Touch sensitive keyboards change how soft or loud the sound plays according to the strength of your playing. These keyboards offer a wide range of expression from delicate to powerful tones. This feature is available on keyboards such as the PSR-E360, E373 and NP Series, and is suitable for a more authentic piano practice experience. Note: This feature is not available on the PSR-F52.

The EZ-300 features a lighted keyboard, on which the keys you should press during lessons or other situations will light up, for players who have a hard time reading sheet music but still want to enjoy playing. See the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual for details. Note: This feature is not available on the PSR-F52.

In quiz mode, the keyboard plays a pitch, and then you try to guess what pitch was played. Aside from pitches and chords, there is also a mode for guessing what kind of sound effects are being played, such as animal sounds. This can be fun for those who aren’t able to play the keyboard yet. This feature is available on models such as the PSR-E273. See the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual for details. Note: This feature is not available on the PSR-F52.

Super Articulation Lite is a feature that emulates how particular instruments play, such as guitar harmonics and scratching noises. On models such as the PSR-E373, you can use this to create a variety of sounds that make your playing sound even more realistic by pressing a button or the pedal while you play. See the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual for details. Note: This feature is not available on the PSR-F52.

A pitch bend wheel is a part of the keyboard that you can use to emulate playing techniques in which the pitch changes, such as the bending of strings on a guitar. Moving the wheel up or down makes the pitch temporarily change. This feature is available on models such as the PSR-E463. See the product page on this website or the Owner’s Manual for details. Note: This feature is not available on the PSR-F52.

DSP (digital signal processing) is a type of effect found on models such as the PSR-E373. DSP effects use digital signal processing to alter the sound. Some examples of DSP effects include the rotary speaker simulations used on sounds like organs, or effects that simulate the sound of a real guitar amp. Note: This feature is not available on the PSR-F52.